Oklahoma City

Share this!

Submit to DeliciousSubmit to DiggSubmit to FacebookSubmit to Google BookmarksSubmit to StumbleuponSubmit to TechnoratiSubmit to TwitterSubmit to LinkedIn

Oklahoma City  is the capital and principal city of the state of Oklahoma, located in the Frontier Country region of the state. Oklahoma City is the primary city of the Oklahoma City-Shawnee-Stillwater Combined Statistical Area containing most of central Oklahoma.
Adventure District
A thriving tourist community; Oklahoma City Zoo, National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, Science Museum Oklahoma, National Softball Hall of Fame and Stadium, and Remington Park Racing & Casino.  
Asian District
The largest Asian population in the state and also a cultural area. Along Classen Blvd from about 22nd Street to N.W. 30th. Businesses include the Super Cao Nguyen market, Lido restaurant, and a number of Pho soup kitchens.  
Bricktown
Warehouse district that has been converted into a restaurant and night club hot spot adjacent to downtown. This area is home to the Bricktown Ballpark, several live music venues, the Harkins movie theatre, and Mickey Mantle's steakhouse.  
Downtown
Central Business District.  
Arts District
Oklahoma City Museum of Art, Civics Center Music Hall, Oklahoma City National Memorial, and the Myriad Botanical Gardens. The Museum of Art includes an upscale restaurant and the glass sculpture of Dale Chihuly. On Thursday evening's in the Spring and Fall, the museum opens its rooftop for cocktails and music.  
Northwest  Plaza Court District
Located near NW 10th and Walker in Midtown, this area is currently under development but already boasts Brasilian, Latin, and American food restaurants, as well as OKC's oldest boutique ice creamery and a bakery. On weekends, a rooftop bossa nova bar offers a beautiful view of this area's interesting architecture. A Sushi restaurant and Irish Pub are slated to open sometime in 2008.  
Paseo Arts District
Arts district with galleries beginning at NW 30th & Paseo to NW 27th & Walker. It also offers a sidewalk cafe, two full service restaurants, and craft shops. Paseo Arts District celebrates "First Friday" each month with an open house and outdoor music. Paseo Arts Festival takes place each Memorial Day weekend with an outdoor carnival and attractions.   NW 39th Street Enclave
Arts district with galleries beginning at NW 30th & Paseo to NW 27th & Walker. It also offers a sidewalk cafe, two full service restaurants, and craft shops. Paseo Arts District celebrates "First Friday" each month with an open house and outdoor music. Paseo Arts Festival takes place each Memorial Day weekend with an outdoor carnival and attractions.  
Western Avenue
A stretch of Western Avenue from NW 36th to Britton Road that features locally owned restaurants, bars, retail shopping, and live music venues.  
South
Capitol Hill Historic District
Hispanic downtown of Oklahoma City, located on the Southside.  

Oklahoma City is the largest city in the state, as well as its political, cultural, and economic engine. The city is the nation's third largest city in land area (608 sq miles), just behind Jacksonville FL (759 sq miles) and way behind Anchorage AK (1698 sq miles). The city is the 29th largest city in population in the nation (506,132 in the 2000 census), and the largest city in the 5 "plains states" (Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, and North and South Dakota). After decades of suburban sprawl and an ill-fated downtown "urban renewal", a 'sudden' burst of investment in the 1990s has given the city additional big city attractions as well as a pleasant quality of life that often is the envy if not surprise of visitors from other cities, making Oklahoma City more of a tourist destination in and of itself. Oklahoma's state capitol building is the only capitol in the world with an oil well under it. Although its legal description is Capitol Site #1, it is referred to as Petunia #1 because it was originally drilled in the middle of a flower bed.

Oklahoma State Capital buildingOklahoma City is in the Frontier Country region of Central Oklahoma, in the Southern Plains of North America. Contrary to popular belief, the geography is not flat and treeless (like in the true high plains) but rather gently rolling hills covered in places by dense low trees, shrubs, and grasses. The city is roughly bisected by the North Canadian River (recently partially renamed the Oklahoma River in a flight of civic exuberance). The North Canadian is not very impressive as rivers go; it was once substantial enough to flood every year, wreaking destruction on surrounding homes, until the 1940s when the Civilian Conservation Corps dammed the river and turned it into essentially a wide ditch for the next 50 years. In the 1990's, as part of the citywide revitalization project known as MAPS, the city built a series of low water dams, returning water to the portion of the river flows near downtown. The city also has three large lakes, Lake Hefner and Lake Overholser, in the northwestern quarter of the city, and the largest - Lake Stanley Draper, in the sparsely populated far southeast of the city.

* Note: Room prices change constantly. You should check the latest availability as in many cases the room price can be even lower than the listed price on the LastBeds website.