Cairns

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Cairns, Cairns are buzzing. Queensland most northerly city. Some 1766 kilometres from Brisbane, it is the tourist gateway to far north Queensland with its fertile southern Tableland, Great Barrier Reef resorts and wonderful rainforests.Blessed with an international Airport, the 60,000 or so inhabitants of Cairns are host to one of the largest tourist developments in Australia. The city of Cairns has grown around Trinity Bay. It started life as port handling tin and gold from inland mines and the oldest parts of the city are found around the harbour area, along Esplanade and Wharf Street. Here, the many old buildings have wide verandas to provide shade.The harbour itself is for the local fishing industry. And what an industry it is. Above all else, Cairns is a marlin fishing centre, attracting game-fishermen from all over the world. Marlins feed about 50 kilometres offshore and are prized for their fighting qualities. Crowds gather at Marlin jetty during the season to watch the boats returning from their sport, hoping to see a huge black marlin of 500 kilograms or more being brought ashore. Tuna, Shark, barracuda and sailfish are also caught in these waters. Fish and coral are also to be seen at the Cairns Reef World, just behind the jetty, and at the Windows on the Reef show at nearby Green Island Wharf. Cairns is a tropical City. Brightly colours birds, exotic palms, fig trees and brilliant displays of flowers are in evidence everywhere. The visitors can enjoy this paradise aboard a horse-drawn wagon or take an inland tour on a paddleboat through the port and on to Admiralty Island to the south. On foot, a place to look out for is the recently opened Cairns Museum which is in the School of Arts building .The Museum holds early Aboriginal artefacts and material, and there are displays of goldmining in the region and on the building of the Kuranda railway. Beaches are not Cairns’ strong suit. Most visitors use Cairns as a base for exploring further afield, travelling north along the coast to find other beaches or taking day trip to Green Island, or coral cay, where they can swim and snorkel. More Exclusive Island Holidays are available at Lizard, Orpheus and Dunk Islands which can be reached by air, or at Fitzroy Island which is under on hours from Cairns by Boat. Inland from Cairns, the Atherton Tableland-part of the Great Dividing Range forms the Barriers between the tropics and outback Queensland to the west. The scenic Railway, built 100 year ago from Cairns to Kuranda, is the most popular first stage in reaching the tablelands from Cairns. The one and a half hour journey winds through deep gorges and sugarcane fields to the base of the Macalister Range and then climbs steeply through tunnels to Kuranda at the top. The panoramic views are spectacular. You can see the coast around Cairns and the Ocean stretching out to the Reef, huge rocky escarpments, and waterfalls at Stoney Creek and in the wet season at Barron Falls. The Tableland beyond Kuranda are rich green, for this is some of Australia’s most fertile arable farmland. It supports a large tobacco industry, crops of potatoes and onions, and for the travellers, pleasant walks along the shores of volcanic lakes, by picturesque waterfalls and in the Chilagoe limestone caves.

 

* Note: Room prices change constantly. You should check the latest availability as in many cases the room price can be even lower than the listed price on the LastBeds website.