Canada

Canada

on Tuesday, 04 October 2011. Posted in Canada

Canada boasts a wide, diverse culture, which we celebrate with pride, and there is simply no way to see everything in one trip - or even in a lifetime. Full of surprises, Canada is simply the most astonishingly beautiful country in the world. For those wanting to take advantage of the outdoors, best time is to visit in the summer. For those wanting to experience everything Canada has to offer, visit in the winter. Temperatures range from plus 40 C in summer to minus 40 C in the winter, so dress accordingly! The typical Canadian might be an elusive concept, but you'll find there's a distinctive feel to the country. Some towns might seem a touch too well-regulated and unspontaneous, but against this there's the overwhelming sense of Canadian pride in their history and pleasure in the beauty of their land. Canada embraces its own clichés with an energy that's irresistible, promoting everything from the Calgary Stampede to maple-syrup festivals and lumberjacking contests with an extraordinary zeal and openness. As John Buchan, writer and Governor-General of Canada, said, "You have to know a man awfully well in Canada to know his surname." Canada is one of the most exciting travel destinations in the world. It has many interesting cities, like Toronto, North Vancouver, Montreal or Halifax. But also some of the most impressive nature, which is great for outdoor activities, like hiking, skiing, rafting and fishing.

Montreal

on Tuesday, 09 August 2011. Posted in Canada

An international destination of choice, Montréal is easily accessed by land, water and air. Downtown is a mere 20 minutes from the Pierre-Elliott Trudeau International Airport, which handles some 600 flights daily. Public transit is not only affordable, it’s also a great way to get around the city. Quick, safe and clean, the metro connects downtown to major tourism attractions, as well as to numerous bus stops and train stations. In addition, cycling enthusiasts enjoy 450 kilometres of bicycle paths, many of which lead to major tourist areas.Don’t forget to ensure you have a valid passport at all times, and in some cases, a visa. American citizens returning home should also be aware that there are new customs requirements in effect . For more information, visit the Web sites of Citizenship and Immigration Canada and the U.S. Department of State.

Ottawa Canada

on Saturday, 30 July 2011. Posted in Canada

Ottawa, Canada’s Capital, sits on the border between the provinces of Ontario and Quebec in central Canada. It was made capital of the British colonial Province of Canada in 1857. In the 20th century, a much-larger Capital region was created to serve as a frame for Canada’s Capital. Since 1969, Ottawa and Gatineau (two cities that face each other across the broad Ottawa River) and the surrounding urban and rural communities have been formally recognized as Canada’s Capital Region. The centre of the Region is the area known as Parliament Hill, where neo-gothic stone buildings and the spire of the Peace Tower rise from the cliffs overlooking the Ottawa River. The Centre Block of Parliament is the heart of Canadian political life, housing the Senate, House of Commons and the impressive Library of Parliament. The central tower, the Peace Tower, houses a 53-bell carillon, a huge clock and the memorial chamber commemorating Canada's war dead. In truth, Ottawa is neither grandiose nor tedious, but a lively cosmopolitan city of 330,000 with a clutch of outstanding national museums , a pleasant riverside setting and superb cultural facilities like the National Arts Centre, plus acres of parks and gardens and miles of bicycle and jogging paths. It also possesses lots of good hotels and B&Bs and a busy café-bar and restaurant scene - enough to keep the most diligent sightseer going for a day or three, maybe more. Here too, for once in English-speaking Ontario, Canada's bilingual laws make sense: Québec's Hull is just across the river and on the streets of Ottawa you'll hear as much French as English. The capital of the second biggest country on the planet, Ottawa struggles with its reputation as a bureaucratic labyrinth of little charm and character. The problem is that many Canadians who aren't federal employees - and even some who are - blame the city for all the country's woes. All too aware of this, the Canadian government have spent lashings of dollars to turn Ottawa into "a city of urban grace in which all Canadians can take pride" - so goes the promotional literature, but predictably this very investment is often resented. Furthermore, the hostility is deeply rooted, dating back as far as 1857 when Queen Victoria, inspired by some genteel watercolours, declared Ottawa the capital, leaving Montréal and Toronto smarting at their rebuff.

Quebec Canada

on Saturday, 30 July 2011. Posted in Canada

Province of eastern Canada; the largest province, second only in area among the nation's administrative subdivisions to the Northwest Territories. Quebec is bordered on the northeast by Labrador, on the east by Newfoundland, on the southeast by New Brunswick and Nova Scotia, and on the west and southwest by Ontario.
On its southern border lie (west–east) the US states of New York, Vermont, New Hampshire, and Maine; area 1,540,700 sq km/594,900 sq mi; population (1991) 6,811,800. The capital is Quebec. Industries include mining (iron, copper, gold, zinc), fishing, and the production of paper, textiles, and maple syrup (70% of world output). Cereals and potatoes are grown. Quebec's Old Town (Le Vieux-Québec), the only North American fortified city north of Mexico whose walls still exist, was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1985. The city, following the 2002 merger with several former surrounding municipalities, has a population of 528,595, while the metropolitan area has a population of 682,757 (2004). Although some districts have been painstakingly restored to give tourists as seductive an introduction to Quebec as possible, this is an authentically and profoundly French city: 95 percent of its 600,000 population are French-speaking, and it is often difficult to remember which continent you are in as you tuck into a croissant and a steaming bowl of coffee in a Parisian-style café. Moreover, despite the fact that the city's symbol is a hotel, the Château Frontenac , the government remains the main employee, not tourism, and some of the more impressive buildings are government-run and off-limits.








Regina

on Monday, 12 September 2011. Posted in Canada

Regina is the capital city of the province of Saskatchewan. It is in the south part of the province on highway No. 1 . Regina is home of the RCMP Training Academy and the CFL Saskatchewan Roughriders.
Regina has more parks and greenspace per capita than any major city in Canada. Wascana Centre is a huge 9.3 square kilometre (2300 acre) park that is built around the shores of Wascana Lake, a man made lake in the heart of Regina. It is one of North America's largest urban parks, and includes several attractions, such as several walking and bicycle paths, the Saskatchewan Science Centre, an outdoor pool, a marina with boat rentals, the Saskatchewan Legislative building, and the Saskatchewan Centre of the Arts.
Willow Island, This Island on Wascana Lake is both open to the public and available for group bookings. A pontoon boat which seats 12 passengers is used to transport people back and forth from the Island.
Central Park
Victoria Park is the park located in Regina's Market Square. It is the venue for many summer and winter events and concerts. In the centre of the park is a war memorial. A few statues dot the park, there is a playground on the South East corner. The park is well treed and has many benches. On summer afternoons expect downtown's business-people to populate the park equally with teenagers (who mostly stay on the grass). The park is on the North side Victoria Avenue between Scarth and Lorne Streets.
A.E. Wilson Park has the Northern entry point to the Devonian Pathway. There are many path intersections in this area, making it great for short walks. The park has the widest points in the creek on the North side of Wascana Lake. It is home to the Jack Hamilton Arena and Rick Hansen Optimist Playground.
Douglas Park houses the Canada Games Athletic Complex and Leibel Field.

Toronto

on Tuesday, 09 August 2011. Posted in Canada

Toronto offers non-stop adventures for the willing tourist, to get a sense of how big, various and magical Toronto is, the best place to start is the CN Tower, the tallest free-standing structure in the world, from this vantage point, visitors get a bird's-eye-view of the city's striking skyline and unique geography.Known as the "economic engine of Canada", Toronto is considered a major world city, exerting significant regional, national, and global influence. Toronto is Canada's financial, cultural, and health sciences centre. It has one of the most diversified economies in North America with the largest concentration of head offices in a variety of fields, the highest concentration of cultural workers and institutions, and the largest arts community in Canada. Indeed, in January 2005, it was designated by the federal government as one of Canada's cultural capitals. It is one of the safest cities to live in North America; its crime rate is lower than that of any major U.S. metropolitan area and is one of the lowest in Canada as well. In addition to being an important cultural and commercial center, Toronto is also a major multiethnic metropolis. The city's population numbers more than 4.5 million people, and its residents come from countries around the world and from all manner of ethnic backgrounds. On any given day, and in most quarters of the city, a hundred different languages can be heard on the streets, from Hindi to Greek to French.
The City of Toronto covers an area of 641 km² (247 square miles) and is bounded by Lake Ontario to the south, Etobicoke Creek and Highway 427 to the west, Steeles Avenue to the north, and the Rouge River to the east. Toronto is the largest city in Canada and since the 1970s has been one of the fastest-changing cities in North America, experiencing an enormous growth in foreign-born residents. In 1998, the cities of Metropolitan Toronto (Toronto, York, East York, North York, Etobicoke, and Scarborough) were merged as Toronto, instantly becoming the continent's fifth largest city.

Vancouver

on Saturday, 30 July 2011. Posted in Canada

Cradled between the ocean and snow-capped mountains, Vancouver's dazzling downtown district fills a narrow peninsula bounded by Burrard Inlet to the north, English Bay to the west and False Creek to the south, with greater Vancouver sprawling south to the Fraser River. Edged around its idyllic waterfront are fine beaches, a dynamic port and a magnificent swath of parkland, not to mention the mirror-fronted ranks of skyscrapers that look across Burrard Inlet and its bustling harbour to the residential districts of North and West Vancouver. Beyond these comfortable suburbs, the Coast Mountains rise in steep, forested slopes to form a dramatic counterpoint to the downtown skyline and the most stunning of the city's many outdoor playgrounds. Small wonder, given Vancouver's surroundings, that Greenpeace was founded in the city. These days Vancouver is more dynamic than ever, its growth and energy almost palpable as you walk the streets. In just five years, between 1987 and 1992, the city's population increased by an extraordinary seventeen percent. The downtown population, currently just over half a million, is the fastest-growing on the continent. In response the downtown area is spreading - visibly - to the older and previously run-down districts to the southeast of the old city core. Vancouver is the largest city on Canada's Pacific coast, the center of the third largest metropolitan area in Canada, and the nation's chief Pacific port, with an excellent year-round harbor. It is the major western terminus of trans-Canadian railroads, highways, and airways, as well as the terminus of a pipeline bringing oil to the west coast from Edmonton. The city's industries include lumbering, shipbuilding, fish processing, and sugar and oil refining. It has textile and knitting mills and plants making metal, wood, paper, and mineral products.

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